What do you get when wine experts from Brazil, Uruguay, Chile and Argentina get together with representatives from the United States, Spain and Portugal? 
 
The fifth annual Latin American Wine Tourism Congress, of course. And along with this meeting of the oenophilic minds in the Uruguayan capital of Montevideo came an idea that was music to all wine lovers’ ears: Latin America’s economies are primed for plenty of growth in the wine-tourism sector. 
 
Ivane Favero, the honorary chair at the conference, pointed out an important factor in wine tourism. Today’s “enotourists”, he said, have a ravenous curiosity for all the world’s wine regions; their appetite is not easily quelled.
 
“Together, we in Latin American are senders and receivers of enotourists,” Favero was quoted as saying in a story this past weekend from the Business Standard. “The enotourist does not tire of seeking out and getting to know the regions that produce a wine and the entire culture surrounding its production.” 
 
Among issues discussed at the conference were how the countries in the region could leverage social media to attract enotourists, what government regulations could be put in place to foster wine tourism and what types of effective training programs could be created for employees in each country’s wine-tourism sectors. 
Discussion at the conference also focused on creating a South American wine route, which no doubt would include Argentina and Chile. Experts at the conference also debated the different strategies that could be used to elevate international knowledge of South American countries. Uruguay’s use of mobile apps to promote its wine tourism was also highlighted, according to the Business Standard.
 
Uruguay has one advantage over its Chilean comrades: Montevideo, the country’s capital city, is the only port in South America’s southern regions (known as the Southern Cone or Cono Sur) in which cruise passengers can visit a winery. 
 
Business from cruise tourism has led wineries to upgrade their facilities in order to meet the influx of enotourists, said Wilson Torres, the country’s Enological Tourism Association’s president. 
 
"In recent years, wine tourism has grown around the world, and our country has been part of the expansion, which has required an upgrade of wineries to meet the demand and the visitors' expectations," Torres said. 
 
Torres taught a session at the conference titled, “Outbound wine tourism in Uruguay: general overview, perspectives and opportunities for wine destinations.” 
 
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